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VoirobRiver of bangladesh

VoirobRive

VoirobRiver of bangladesh
VoirobRiver of bangladesh


Jessore is one of the ancient locality in our country. From the historical information, about 25000 years ago Jessore was built by the alluvium of the river Ganga. . There are various types of people used to say about the name “Jessore”. From the book of Cunningham we found “Jossor” means bridge. By the rotation of time from “Jossor” turned into “Jessore”.
A section of influential people identified as Siddique Munshi and his gang group have continued grabbing and lifting sand, earth randomly from the Buri-VoirobRiver flowing between Kaliganj upazila under Jhenidah and Jessore district, intensifying the threat of erosion in the area, alleged local people Monir Khan of the villager of Hasilbagh village.
Around three hundred acres of cropland and over five hundred dwellings at Hasilbagh village and several establishments are under threat due to illegal pond digging in the river and unplanned sand and earth lifting from few months, alleged an 80 years old man.
During a recent visit, this correspondent saw 10/12 day labourers lifting sand and earth randomly and grabbing 12 bighas of land for making a pond in river after giving barricade in the river in Gahaj Ghat area under Hasilbagh village.
Huge amount of sand and earth, sufficient to load at least 30 to 35 tractors, is lifted daily for sending to different areas.  Sand loaded in a tractor is now selling for Tk 300 to Tk 350, alleged an elderly person of the area.
Sand lifter and river grabber Hazi Siddique Munshi of Hasilbagh village under Barobazaar union porishod in Kaliganj upazila said to the correspondent that they lift sand from the river and making a pond in 12 bigha for fish farming as their arable lands went into the river. But he didn’t give any prove documents for his comment then.
Villagers of the area said they lost their landed property due to the river erosion caused by the callous act in next rainy season.
Assisting land officer of Kastovanga union porishod Robindranath Kha said to The Independent that we have noticed him several times after getting allegation from the local people but he didn’t stop it. He is doing his illegal work as his own desire.
Several locals requesting anonymity said we have submitted written complaint to the upazila nirbahi officer (UNO) of Kaliganj but no action is taken against the illegal sand and earth lifters and river grabber.
UNO Eradul Haque admitted receiving the complaint and said, “We will start drives to stop the illegal sand lifting within a short time.”

SM Sultan, Man of Asia

Sheikh Mohammed Sultan
SM Sultan, Man of Asia
Sheikh Mohammed Sultan
Birth name: Sheikh Mohammed Sultan
Born: 10 August 1923 Narail, Bangladesh
Died: 10 October 1994 (aged 71)
Nationality: Bangladeshi
Field: Painting, Drawing
Awards: Ekushey Padak (1982), Independence Day Award (1993)

Sheikh Mohammed Sultan (1923–1994), better known as SM Sultan, was a painter from Bangladesh. Sultan was born on 10 August 1923 in Masimdia, Narail district, Bangladesh. He was declared the Man of Asia in 1982 by University of Cambridge.
After only five years of schooling in Victoria Collegiate School in Narail, Sultan joined with his father to work as a mason. He began to draw the buildings his father worked on and developed an artistic disposition. He wanted to go to Kolkata to study art but his family did not have the means to send him there. Eventually, Sultan went to Kolkata in 1938 with monetary support from the local zamindar (landlord).
Having inadequate qualifications for admission into the Art School in Kolkata, Sultan only managed to get in through the help of the poet and art critic Hasan Shahid Suhrawardy (1890–1965, Who introduced Jamini Roy to the world) a member of the school's governing body also known as elder brother of Shahid Suhrawardy, former Prime Minister of Pakistan. Sultan also stayed at Suhrawardy's house and was allowed use of his library. Sultan, however, never completed his education.
After three years at the school, his Bohemian nature had the better of him and he went travelling around India and working as a freelance artist. During his travels, he made a living by drawing portraits of allied soldiers who camped at the place he was visiting. In this period, his first exhibition was held in Simla, though none of these works have survived, mainly due to Sultan's own indifference towards preserving his work. After living and working in Kashmir for a while, Sultan returned to Narail in the wake of the Partition of India, Narail now part of Bangladesh.
A confirmed bachelor, Sultan settled down in an abandoned building in Narail overlooking the river Chitra, where he lived ever since with an adopted family and pets of his own including dogs, mongoose and monkeys. Sultan would later build a mini-zoo near his home. Apart from occasional visits to Dhaka, Sultan only once left Narail for any substantial period of time. He became interested in a ruined house in Sonargaon, pretty much like his own home in Narail, and lived there for a period.
Sultan's first exhibition in Dhaka was in 1976, inordinately late for a painter of his stature. Sultan died in 1994.
SM Sultan won the "Ekushey Padak" in 1982, Bangladesh Charu Shilpi Sangsad award in 1986 and the "Independence Award" in 1993. In 1989, Tareque Masud directed a 54 minute documentary film on SM Sultan's life, called Adam Surat (The Inner Strength). Masud started filming it in 1982 with the help of the painter, and traveled with him all around Bangladesh with Sultan. According to Masud, Sultan agreed to cooperate only on the condition that "... rather than being the film's subject, he would act as a catalyst to reveal the film's true protagonist, the Bengali peasant". Bangladesh government recently completed the construction of Sultan memorial complex though it hasn't yet been inaugurated. Sultan, of course, had a special relation with Narail. He was known to the locals as "Lal Mia", a most informal and homely name only to be given to a close person. Chetona Theatre from Narail has staged Aango Lal Mia (Our Lal Mia) on Sultan. In 2005, famous Bangladeshi photographer Nasir Ali Mamun published a book named Guru with 68 photographs of Sultan. These were selected from thousands of photographs taken by Mamun in the period from 1978, when he first met with Sultan until his death.

Nilgiri and Thanchi tourist spot of Bangladesh

Nilgiri and Thanchi tourist spot
Nilgiri and Thanchi tourist spot of Bangladesh
Nilgiri and Thanchi tourist spot of Bangladesh
Nilgiri or Nil Giri is one of the tallest peaks and beautiful tourist spot in Bangladesh. It is about 3500 feet high and situated at Thanci Thana. It is about 46 km south of Bandarban on the Bandarban-Chimbuk-Thanchi road. Beside this spot you can see Mro villages. Their colorful culture and living style are surely an unexplored experience for the visitors. In rainy season here creates a spectacular scenery, the whole spot is covered with the blanket of clouds. You can enjoy a cloudy experience. Winter is waiting for you with it’s foggy gesture on the height. It is a nice place for campfire in that season. Most attractive time is the dawn. It is better if you chose to stay during 7-18 dates of a lunar month to enjoy the moonlit night. You can also enjoy the serpentine course of Sangu River. This is the most spectacular tourist spot in Bandarban and managed by Army brigade of Bandarban.
There is beautiful resort in the top of the mountain maintain by the Bangladesh Army. You have to confirm the reservation through army officer. There are three well furnished cottages ranging from Tk4000-7000. There are also three tents having 4 beds each Tk2000 per tent. There is also restaurant, helipad etc. Electricity available from 6-9 pm and temperature near 10-25 degree Celsius.
Nilgiri is 46 kilometer away from Bandarban sadar. Visitor can hire a private vehicle from Bandarban sadar or you can go there by Thanci bound bus or jeep. On the way to Nilgiri Visitor have to register his name and address to the military check post.

Tajingdong Hill stations of Bangladesh

Tajingdong Hill 
Tajingdong Hill stations of Bangladesh
Tajingdong Hill stations of Bangladesh
Tajingdong also known as “Bijoy” is the highest mountain of Bangladesh. Tajingdong is about 4300 ft (1310 meters) high from the sea level. It is situated in remakri pangsha union under Ruma upazilla of Bandarban in Bangladesh. According to local tribal language “Tajing” means “Great” & “Dong” means “Hill” so that means “Great hill”.
There are various tribal community is developed surrounding the mountain and their living styles are so natural. This remote area is full of natural beauty. Here you can see many small and big mountains and hills. This area is covered with dense forests, birds and animals.
There are many tourist visits the Tajingdong Mountain in every year. It is the place of surprising beauty. This natural beauty is surely attracts the mind of the adventurous people. In the winter season many adventurous tourist visit this place with great excitement. You will pleased with the dazzling beauty of green hill, cool fountains, zigzag path, hilly road side, hide and seek game of clouds on the top of the hill.
For visiting Tajingdong you have to reach at Bandarban first then go to Ruma Upazilla. Ruma is 50 kilometer away from Bandarban. You should remember that after 4 pm you are not allowed to leave Ruma for visiting Bogalake, Keokradong or Tajingdong. As it is a remote area of Bangladesh, the road is not so plain. The communication systems of Bogalake become very difficult in the Rainy season. The road is still under construction. From Ruma you can hire a pickup or jeep (locally known as “Chander Gari”) up to Koikhong Jiri at the fare of about Tk. 2000-200. You can also go there by buying tickets of Chander Gari or Bus. The first trip is at 9am. It will take 1-1.30 hrs. Koikhhong Jiri to Ruma you have to go by one hour boat journey. Again Ruma to Boga Lake you should hire a jeep at the fare of about Tk. 1800-2000. Finally you have to walk through the hills from Boga Lake to Tajingdong.
Remember that, this journey is very much laborious. So keep confidence. Always carry drinking water and first aid box with you. Show positive attitude with local people and should respect the tribal culture.
There are some residential hotels in Ruma Bazar, so you have to confirm at first the hotel reservation before going to Ruma, otherwise you will have no alternative passing the night. If you are fortunate you can get tribal house to pass the night.
In Bogalake There is no other accommodation facility except the rest houses of district council. There is no mobile network, no restaurant and also no good road communication. You should start your journey early in the morning from Bogalake to reach Tajingdong and it may take 7 to 8 hours to reach Tajingdong. However, the sceneries of cool air, white clouds, hills, river and lake are really unique and incomparable. If you go there obviously you can get an enjoyable, delightful and thrilling experience.

Keokradong Hill stations of Bangladesh

Keokradong
Keokradong Hill stations of Bangladesh
Keokradong Hill stations of Bangladesh
Keokradong is the second highest mountain of Bangladesh. Keokradong is about 4,035 ft (1,230 meters) high from the sea level. It is situated in 30km away from the Ruma sadar upazilla of Bandarban in Bangladesh. This remote area is full of natural beauty. Here you can see many small and big mountains and hills. This area is covered with dense forests, birds and animals.
Keokradong Mountain is located on the border between Bangladesh and Myanmar. It is the place of surprising beauty. This natural beauty is surely attracts the mind of the adventurous people. In the winter season many adventurous tourist visit this place with great excitement. You will pleased with the dazzling beauty of green hill, cool fountains, zigzag path, hilly road side, hide and seek game of clouds on the top of the hill.
For visiting Keokradong you have to reach at Bandarban first then go to Ruma Upazilla. Ruma is 50 kilometer away from Bandarban. You should remember that after 4 pm you are not allowed to leave Ruma for visiting Bogalake, Keokradong or Tajingdong. As it is a remote area of Bangladesh, the road is not so plain. The communication systems of Bogalake become very difficult in the Rainy season. The road is still under construction. From Ruma you can hire a pickup or jeep (locally known as “Chander Gari”) up to Koikhong Jiri at the fare of Tk. 1800-2000. You can also go there by buying tickets of Chander Gari or Bus. The first trip is at 9am. It will take 1-1.30 hrs. Koikhong Jiri to Ruma you have to go by one hour boat journey. Again Ruma to Boga Lake you should hire a jeep at the fare of Tk. 1800. Two tribal communities named Saikotpara and Darjilingpara are 4 km away from Bogalake. There are some tribal groups live in this area. Darjilingpara is about 1 km away from Keokradong. It will take another 45 minute to reach the highest point of Keokradong and you have to walk through the hills from Boga Lake to Keokradong to go there.
Remember that, this journey is very much laborious. So keep confidence. Always carry drinking water and first aid box with you. Show positive attitude with local people and should respect the tribal culture.
There are some residential hotels in Ruma Bazar, so you have to confirm at first the hotel reservation before going to Ruma, otherwise you will have no alternative passing the night. If you are fortunate you can get tribal house to pass the night.
In Bogalake There is no other accommodation facility except the rest houses of district council. There is no mobile network, no restaurant and also no good road communication. You should start your journey early in the morning from Bogalake to reach Keokradong and it may take 5 to 6 hours to reach Keokradong. However, the sceneries of cool air, white clouds, hills, river and lake are really unique and incomparable. If you go there obviously you can get an enjoyable, delightful and thrilling experience.

Buddha Purnima festivals of Bangladesh

Buddha Purnima
Buddha Purnima festivals of Bangladesh
Buddha Purnima festivals of Bangladesh
Vesākha Wesak or Vesak also known as Buddha Purnima is a holy day observed traditionally by Buddhists in Sri Lanka, Tibet, Bangladesh, Bhutan, India, Nepal and the South East Asian countries of Singapore, Vietnam, Thailand, Cambodia, Laos, Malaysia, Myanmar, the Philippines, and Indonesia. Sometimes informally called "Buddha's Birthday", it actually commemorates the birth, enlightenment (nirvāna), and death (Parinirvāna) of Gautama Buddha.
The exact date of Vesākha varies according to the various lunar calendars used in different traditions. In Theravada countries following the Buddhist calendar, it falls on a full moon Uposatha day, typically in the 5th or 6th lunar month. Vesākha Day in China and Korea is on the eighth of the fourth month in the Chinese lunar calendar. The date varies from year to year in the Western Gregorian calendar, but usually falls in April or May. In leap years Vesākha is celebrated in June.
The decision to agree to celebrate Vesākha as the Buddha’s birthday was formalized at the first conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists held in Sri Lanka in 1950, although festivals at this time in the Buddhist world are a centuries-old tradition. The resolution that was adopted at the World Conference reads as follows.
That this Conference of the World Fellowship of Buddhists, while recording its appreciation of the gracious act of His Majesty, the Maharaja of Nepal in making the full-moon day of Vesak a Public Holiday in Nepal, earnestly requests the Heads of Governments of all countries in which large or small number of Buddhists are to be found, to take steps to make the full-moon day in the month of May a Public Holiday in honour of the Buddha, who is universally acclaimed as one of the greatest benefactors of Humanity.
On Vesākha Day, Buddhists all over the world commemorate events of significance to Buddhists of all traditions: The birth, enlightenment and the passing away of Gautama Buddha. As Buddhism spread from India it was assimilated into many foreign cultures, and consequently Vesākha is celebrated in many different ways all over the world.
In 1999, the United Nations resolved to internationally observe the day of Vesak at its headquarters and offices.
May 2007 had two full moon days, the 1st and the 31st. Some countries (including Sri Lanka, Cambodia and Malaysia) celebrated Vesākha on the 1st, while others (Thailand, Singapore) celebrated the holiday on the 31st due to different local lunar observance. This difference also manifests in the observance of other Buddhist holidays, which are traditionally observed at the local full moon.
Likewise, in 2012, Vesak or the birth anniversary of the Buddha was observed on 28 April in Hong Kong and Taiwan, on 5 May in Sri Lanka, on 6 May in India, on 28 May in South Korea and on 4 June in Thailand. (In 1999 the Taiwanese government set Buddha's birthday as the second Sunday of May, the same date as Mother's Day.
On Vesākha day, devout Buddhists and followers alike are expected and requested to assemble in their various temples before dawn for the ceremonial, and honorable, hoisting of the Buddhist flag and the singing of hymns in praise of the holy triple gem: The Buddha, The Dharma (his teachings), and The Sangha (his disciples). Devotees may bring simple offerings of flowers, candles and joss-sticks to lay at the feet of their teacher. These symbolic offerings are to remind followers that just as the beautiful flowers would wither away after a short while and the candles and joss-sticks would soon burn out, so too is life subject to decay and destruction. Devotees are enjoined to make a special effort to refrain from killing of any kind. They are encouraged to partake of vegetarian food for the day. In some countries, notably Sri Lanka, two days are set aside for the celebration of Vesākha and all liquor shops and slaughter houses are closed by government decree during the two days. Also birds, insects and animals are released by the thousands in what is known as a 'symbolic act of liberation'; of giving freedom to those who are in captivity, imprisoned, or tortured against their will.[citation needed] Some devout Buddhists will wear a simple white dress and spend the whole day in temples with renewed determination to observe the eight Precepts.

Christmas festivals of Bangladesh

Christmas

Christmas festivals of Bangladesh
Christmas festivals of Bangladesh

Christmas (Old English: Crīstesmæsse, meaning "Christ's Mass") is an annual commemoration of the birth of Jesus Christ and a widely observed holiday, celebrated generally on December by millions of people around the world. A feast central to the Christian liturgical year, it closes the Advent season and initiates the twelve days of Christmastide, which ends after the twelfth night. Christmas is a civil holiday in many of the world's nations, is celebrated by an increasing number of non-Christians, and is an integral part of the Christmas and holiday season.
While the birth year of Jesus is estimated among modern historians to have been between 7 and 2 BC, the exact month and day of his birth are unknown. His birth is mentioned in two of the four canonical gospels. By the early-to-mid 4th century, the Western Christian Church had placed Christmas on December 25, a date later adopted in the East. The date of Christmas may have initially been chosen to correspond with the day exactly nine months after early Christians believed Jesus to have been conceived, and became generally associated with the southern solstice (i.e., the Roman winter solstice), with a sun connection being possible because Christians consider Jesus to be the "Sun of righteousness" prophesied in Malachi 4:2.
The original date of the celebration in Eastern Christianity was January 6, in connection with Epiphany, and that is still the date of the celebration for the Armenian Apostolic Church and in Armenia, where it is a public holiday. As of 2013, there is a difference of 13 days between the modern Gregorian calendar and the older Julian calendar. Those who continue to use the Julian calendar or its equivalents thus celebrate December 25 and January 6, which on the Gregorian calendar translate as January 7 and January 19. For this reason, Ethiopia, Russia, Georgia, Ukraine, Serbia, the Republic of Macedonia, and the Republic of Moldova celebrate Christmas on what in the Gregorian calendar is January 7.
Eastern Orthodox Churches in Bulgaria, Greece, Romania, Antioch, Alexandria, Albania, Finland, and the Orthodox Church in America celebrate Christmas on December 25 in the revised Julian calendar, corresponding to December 25 also in the Gregorian calendar.
The popular celebratory customs associated in various countries with Christmas have a mix of pre-Christian, Christian, and secular themes and origins. Popular modern customs of the holiday include gift giving, Christmas music and caroling, an exchange of Christmas cards, church celebrations, a special meal, and the display of various Christmas decorations, including Christmas trees, Christmas lights, nativity scenes, garlands, wreaths, mistletoe, and holly. In addition, several closely related and often interchangeable figures, known as Santa Claus, Father Christmas, Saint Nicholas, and Christkind, are associated with bringing gifts to children during the Christmas season and have their own body of traditions and lore. Because gift-giving and many other aspects of the Christmas festival involve heightened economic activity among both Christians and non-Christians, the holiday has become a significant event and a key sales period for retailers and businesses. The economic impact of Christmas is a factor that has grown steadily over the past few centuries in many regions of the world.

Christmas Day is celebrated as a major festival and public holiday in countries around the world, including many whose populations are mostly non-Christian. In some non-Christian countries, periods of former colonial rule introduced the celebration (e.g. Hong Kong); in others, Christian minorities or foreign cultural influences have led populations to observe the holiday. Countries such as Japan, where Christmas is popular despite there being only a small number of Christians, have adopted many of the secular aspects of Christmas, such as gift-giving, decorations, and Christmas trees.

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